Thoughts on Continental Extreme Contact DWS06 Tires

Discussion in 'Challenger Wheels, Tires and Brakes Forum' started by Vonpalyka, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. Vonpalyka

    Vonpalyka Member

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    Hi guys,
    I'm debating on getting 4 Continental Extreme Contact DWS06 A/S tires. I was pretty set until I started reading lots of reviews saying they don't last too long. Does anyone have experience with these tires?

    I might end up getting dedicated Winter tires down the road, but for now am looking for something that will be good driving here in MI mostly year round (minus heavy snow obviously).

    Anyone have thoughts or recommendations of a good A/S tire? I was looking at the Continental vs maybe Michelin Pilot Sport A/S? Any thoughts?

    I'm trying of getting stuck even in the lightest of snow.

    Thank you!
     
  2. SRT-Tom

    SRT-Tom Full Access Member Article Writer

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    I did a lot of research and bought the new Cooper Zeon RS3-G1 all-season tires from Discount Tire. The tires have tremendous grip and have a high wear rating of 500 AAA (45,000 mile warranty). Also, they are not super expensive ($172- 245/45-20 and $188- 275/40-20). I also got a $50 rebate from Cooper. I highly recommend them.

    Check out the reviews:

    https://www.challengerforum.com/threads/new-cooper-g1-tires-for-my-srt.3123/#post-13050

    That being said, all-season tires are fine for light snow, but since you live in Michigan, I would invest in a set of four Blizzaks for the winter. They are fantastic. I had them on one of my cars and never got stuck in the snow.

    Tires 003.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019
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  3. B5blueRT

    B5blueRT Full Access Member

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    I live in northeast Ohio. Because of lake effect snow areas just north of me can receive an inch or two of snow but I'll get 4-6" due to higher elevation. I bit the bullet and bought four 18" winter tires and mounted them on used Challenger wheels with TPMS sensors installed. I don't have to worry about driving or geting caught in the snow and my 20" all season tires and wheels stay salt free and will last longer since they aren't getting mileage all year long.
    I downsized to 235's instead of 245's because the smaller contact patch with the ground helps push the tire through the snow instead of riding on top of it. Doing 18" wheels and tires were also a little less expensive.
    I figured, why mess around, do it right the first time.
     
  4. 2010RT

    2010RT Full Access Member

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    8DC92A75-F94B-45D2-896A-97722E123FA4.jpeg I would look into all weather tires. I wont drive the Challenger in the winter, instead we have a Journey that I put Goodrich all weathers on and noticed a huge difference on snow and ice. These tires usually have the twin mountain peaks to designate all weather...so I was told.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2019
  5. Vonpalyka

    Vonpalyka Member

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    thanks for all the help guys! I need to get new tires anyways (mine are horrible). I've been debating back and forth on getting dedicated tires for winter. I need new tires anyways so I figured I'll get those first then probably get the winter tires/wheels as well. Not sure if I can do it this winter, if not definitely next. Was looking at getting the blizzaks for winter (as Tom mentioned above). So 18" 235's are prob best for the winter size?

    Those of you driving in the winter on dedicated tires, it is a huge difference? I know I need them, just seems like such a pain trying to get them put on and haul them back and forth twice a year (winter/spring) but I'm so tired of worrying about getting stuck.

    Is there an advantage for switching wheel/tire sizes for tires (not meant for winter per se)? I have stock 245/45 20" on my challenger now.

    So out of curiosity, is it the powerful engine that's making me get stuck all the time in snow? I've driven rear wheel drive manual cars my whole life here in MI and rarely ever got stuck before.
     
  6. SRT-Tom

    SRT-Tom Full Access Member Article Writer

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    It is your current tires that are causing a loss of traction in the snow- not your car.

    A narrower winter tire, like a 235/18, will work best. Here is an explanation from Tire Rack:

    "As you're shopping for winter wheels and tires, you'll likely come across the recommendation of going to a narrower tire. This is the exact opposite approach that you would take for summer traction, where wider is better. If you're likely to drive through deep snow this year, you'll want winter / snow tires and wheels in sizes that help put the laws of physics on your side.

    The reason for this is that traction is achieved in winter by cutting through the ice and snow. With wider tread, you're more likely to start snow plowing or floating on top of the surface instead of pushing down and through. This floating will result in loss of traction sooner than with a thinner or narrower option. A good way to picture this is imagine a pizza cutter slicing through a pizza.

    Another way to think about this is from the perspective of the contact patch. A tire's contact patch or "footprint" greatly influences its performance. On the same vehicle, the area of the contact patch essentially remains the same with different width tires. When the footprint gets narrower as it will with a narrower width tire, it has to get longer. And the mechanics of the longer footprint help with the longitudinal traction for acceleration and braking."
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2019
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  7. B5blueRT

    B5blueRT Full Access Member

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    The info SRT-Tom found on Tire Rack is a better explanation of the answer I gave earlier. Yeah, it's a hassle to swap twice a year, but having both sets balanced and mounted on wheels makes the switch pretty easy. You'll stretch the useful life of the tires (treadwear) since you'd be swapping in November and March/April.

    Winter tires do make a big difference in getting through accumulated snow. They also provide better traction on ice and packed snow compared to all season tires. I started using winter tires on all three of our vehicles two years ago and couldn't believe how much better the cars/SUV handled.

    For the Challenger, doing 235/55R18's will be very close to the diameter of the 245/45R20's the car came with. 28.2" diameter vs. 28.6" , so MPH and other speed related computer data won't be effected. To save some money, search for used 18" Challenger wheels on EBay, Craigslist or Facebook. Use Tire Rack and Discount Tire to get an idea on pricing of both tires and aftermarket wheels.

    I have had good luck with my Cooper Evolution winter tires. Take a look at that chart 2010RT posted, depending on your area, you may want to get "All Weather" instead of "Winter". I got winter tires because my area can get slammed with over 6" downfalls at any time. All Weather would give you better treadwear, I was more concerned with traction knowing they might only last two or three seasons if driven more on wet/dry asphalt instead of snow.

    BTW, when it's really slippery out, from a complete stop try starting off in 2nd gear. You'll be less likely to spin the rear wheels and have the traction control go crazy. Adding some extra weight in the truck will also help but I haven't had to do this yet.
     
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  8. B5blueRT

    B5blueRT Full Access Member

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    Here's my two sets of wheel/tire combo's.
    the 20" Factory wheels
    Caliper-Pentastar 4-2019.jpeg

    The 18" used wheels and Cooper Winter tires. The wheels cost $300 with shipping out of CA. In very good condition.
    Challenger Fender Pentastar.jpeg
     
  9. SRT-Tom

    SRT-Tom Full Access Member Article Writer

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    Another good source of used wheels are salvage yards. Here is a link to a national database:

    http://www.car-part.com/
     
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  10. STEVEN NIX

    STEVEN NIX Member

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    i just went through tire changes this summer. i was looking for an all season high speed tire. note ULTRA HIGH PERFORMANCE or UHP tires will flat spot after a week of sitting. i went with genral g-max tires first. 1 week, flat spotting. got the tire dealer to switch them out to
    EXTREMECONTACT DWS 06
    great tire , 1 week , flat spotting. i chose to deal with it by using work area floor ant- fatigue mats doubled up under tires. works good. my suggestion is to go with the conti's that are v-rated. this is out of the uhp class and will not flat spot. GOOD LUCK
     
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