Winter Storage

Discussion in 'Dodge Challenger General Discussions' started by SRT-Tom, Jan 9, 2019.

  1. SRT-Tom

    SRT-Tom Full Access Member

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  2. jbitter_99

    jbitter_99 New Member

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    Thanks!
     
  3. ZEN357

    ZEN357 Full Access Member

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    I only store mine from October to April, is it really necessary to all that considering it in a heated garage, with a trickle charger on it and cover up?
     
  4. SRT-Tom

    SRT-Tom Full Access Member

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    Five months' storage is a long time. The steps stated on the winterization web site represent the best possible advice. I don't store my SRT during the winter but, if I did, I would follow them.

    What you feel is adequate is up to you.
     
  5. B5blueRT

    B5blueRT Active Member

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    I'm no expert but I've been storing one or two vehicles every winter (for 5 months) over the past 30 years. I think the link Tom provided gives excellent recommendations but I personally feel some of it is overkill for a 5-6 month term. I'd follow ALL of the steps like flushing the brake fluid, antifreeze, etc. for Long Term storage of one or more years.
    I've had my 60's and 70's musclecars parked in a heated garage on Race Deck plastic tiles. I highly recommend using a gas additive like Stabil 360 and storing with a full tank of gas. I do all the cleaning and polishing mentioned, but I don't use jackstands... I've heard arguments both ways. I use a good car cover (Noah is my preferred), plug the exhaust pipes with tennis balls and hook up a battery tender and put a few dissicant bags in the interior. A few years I also put the cars in one of those drive on "Car Bags" which totally zipped up and seals it when the storage area was dirty or dusty. It kept the dust and dirt from getting all over the undercarriage and in the engine compartment. I do my oil changes in the spring when the cars come out of storage unless I put on enough miles to change it in the fall.
    That's how I've stored my '15 Challenger until this season. I've never had any issues or flat spots on the tires. I think the flat spots are inherent with some manufacturer's tires.
    As Tom mentioned, it's all up to what you feel is adequate. (look how long some new cars sit on a dealer's lot before getting purchased.)
     
  6. 10DYRT

    10DYRT Full Access Member

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    I've been parking mine in a heated garage, putting the factory wheels back on the car, full tank of fuel. About once a month when we get a
    day above freezing fire it up back it onto the driveway. Don't turn it off until it has run for at least 10 minutes after the stat has opened.
    While it is running move it in and out of the garage a few times to get the gear oil, tranny fluid moving to keep seals lubricated.
    No problems with critters here.
     
  7. SRT-Tom

    SRT-Tom Full Access Member

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    [QUOTE="10DYRT, post: 15804, member: 688" About once a month when we get a
    day above freezing fire it up back it onto the driveway. Don't turn it off until it has run for at least 10 minutes after the stat has opened.[/QUOTE]


    I wouldn’t let my engine idle for an excessive amount of time. Tests have shown that running an engine at low speed (idling) causes twice the wear on internal parts compared to driving at regular speeds. A better solution would be to take your car on a short drive once a week, assuming the roads are dry. That is what I do in the winter.

    Excessive idling, especially in very cold weather, can actually damage your engine components, including cylinders, spark plugs, and exhaust systems (due to water condensation). An idling engine is not operating at its peak temperature, which means that fuel does not undergo complete combustion. This leaves fuel residue that can condense on cylinder walls, where they can contaminate the oil and damage parts of the engine.
     
  8. 10DYRT

    10DYRT Full Access Member

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    Not idling for more than a minute or 2 at a time. around 1200 rpm for most of it. Also not below freezing temps outside when I do this.
    They have started using the liquid de-icing solutions on the roads here in the winter, they look dry but my daily driver is covered in the stuff.
    after it is dry it is almost like a fine powder dust on the side of the road.