Challenger Maintenance

  • Nitrogen in Tires- Pros & Cons

    Has it ever occurred to you to fill your tires with anything other than air? Because nitrogen is more stable than oxygen, it is commonly used in vehicles that require precise tuning, such as race cars, industrial machinery, aircraft, and spacecraft. That makes some drivers think that nitrogen is a better choice for their daily driver and there could be some truth to that. However, whether or not that’s true for your car depends on a number of factors. Consider that the air we breathe is...
  • Top Tier Gasoline

    Top Tier is a performance standard for gasoline, backed by major automakers. Since the 1990s, the Environmental Protection Agency has required a minimum level of detergent for all gas sold in the United States. But some automakers say the EPA standards are not good enough. To be considered Top Tier, the gasoline must have a higher concentration of detergent added to it. Some brands use the minimum level of detergent additives required by the EPA, others add proprietary formulations of...
  • Common Tire Safety Myths

    Let's debunk the following 9 tire safety myths. Having TPMS means I do not have to check my air pressure unless the warning light comes on. The Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) is designed to provide a warning of low tire pressure in order to avoid tire failure. It will not monitor and sustain the recommended air pressure. In fact, the TPMS warning light is not required to come on until the air pressure is 25% below the vehicle’s recommended air pressure. This means that you still...
  1. Featured

    Proper Tire Pressure in Cold Weather

    It’s known that when the temperature decreases by 10 degrees, tire pressure drops between 1 and 2 pounds per square inch (PSI). It happens not because the air escapes from the tire but because the air inside the tire starts condensing as the temperature decreases, and then it takes up less space. This is how the tire becomes under-inflated. This problem is seen mostly in the winter mornings because the car is parked all night and the air condenses. When the tires are properly inflated, and...
  2. Paintless Dent Repair

    Paintless Dent Repair (PDR) is an environmentally friendly repair method that restores a vehicle’s body to factory-like condition in a fraction of the time at a fraction of the cost. PDR can be used to remove dings and dents from vehicles, as well as creases and hail damage, as long as the paint is not chipped or cracked. Overall, PDR is an excellent alternative to traditional repairs. Each day, PDR technicians across the country safely restore vehicles to their original factory condition...
  3. 2013 Dodge Challenger miss shifting and overheating

    My 2013 dodge challenger sxt was sitting in my barn for a month or 2 while I waited for a coolant line to arrive. well while the car was sitting a mouse ended up crawling into it and dying. Anyways I ended up getting the coolant hose and putting it on. drove to work no problem which is 35 miles away. Then I pick up my girlfriend and while leaving I got on it and it would not shift into second gear. I pulled into a parking lot and turned around got back on the road and it drove fine. drove...
  4. Does Motor Oil Expire?

    If you change your own oil, the chances are you’ve got some old engine oil on your shelf. Likely it’s nothing more than an opened 1-liter top-up bottle, or an unused 4-liter bottle. You then wonder, "Does motor oil expire?" WHAT DO THE OIL COMPANIES SAY? There is a general consensus of terminology coming from the oil companies that unused, unopened, and stored in its original container out of extremes of temperature, motor oil will last for an “extended period”. They then go on to suggest...
  5. My take on the Challenger Rust issue

    My experience arresting the back quarter panel rust issue caused by the foam insulation.
  6. Oil

    Can anyone tell me where i can get the pennzoil ultra ow40 oil very hard to find in Canada,Chrysler changed from Mobil to Pennzoil,would like to do my own oil change when putting away for winter
  7. Threadlocker Adhesives

    Threadlockers, as the name suggests, are used to lock the threads of fasteners such as screws, bolts, studs of different sizes which are used in different applications- especially automotive. This type of adhesive prevents loosening caused by vibration, mechanical and thermal shock. Chemically speaking, most thread-locking formulas are methacrylate-based and rely on the electro-chemical activity of a metal substrate to cause polymerization of the fluid. Thread-locking fluid has unique...
  8. Maintaining Correct Tire Pressure

    Maintaining tire pressure may seem like a low priority, but keeping the correct air pressure in your tires is an important part of vehicle maintenance. It helps in the following areas: · Safety · Optimizing tire performance · Improving fuel economy · Improving handling and performance while driving · Extending treadwear · Maintaining steering response · Improving cornering ability and stability · Improving steering precision Your tires are properly inflated when they match the...
  9. Nitrogen in Tires- Pros & Cons

    Has it ever occurred to you to fill your tires with anything other than air? Because nitrogen is more stable than oxygen, it is commonly used in vehicles that require precise tuning, such as race cars, industrial machinery, aircraft, and spacecraft. That makes some drivers think that nitrogen is a better choice for their daily driver and there could be some truth to that. However, whether or not that’s true for your car depends on a number of factors. Consider that the air we breathe is...
  10. What is Octane?

    When you pull into a gas station, you usually presented with four options: regular, plus, premium and ultra premium. But, have you ever wondered what those numbers- 87, 89, 91 and 93 mean? Octane is the measure of how much compression a fuel can withstand before igniting. The higher the octane rating, the less likely the fuel is going to pre-ignite (i.e., explode unexpectedly) at higher pressures and damage your engine. That’s why performance cars with higher compression engines require...
  11. Featured

    Prevent Tire Flat-Spotting

    It’s not uncommon for some of us to leave our cars parked for long stretches of time- sometimes spanning days, weeks or even months. If you’re one of these car owners, you may notice a slight ride disturbance or vibration the first time you drive your car, but it will usually disappear after a few miles of driving. This phenomenon is known as flat-spotting. Flat-spotting occurs when the weight of a car presses down on the same section of an immobile tire for long enough, and under the right...
  12. Featured

    Pistons

    Pistons are one of the hardest working components of an internal combustion engine, where temperatures inside cylinders can reach over 1,800 degrees F. Early pistons were of cast iron, but there were obvious benefits for engine balancing if a lighter alloy could be used. To produce pistons that could survive engine combustion temperatures, it was necessary to develop new alloys such as Y alloy and hiduminium (high-strength aluminum alloy), specifically for use as pistons. A few early gas...
  13. Featured

    Types of Brake Rotors

    Brake rotors come in many different types. Before you can purchase a fresh set of brake rotors, you should understand each of these different types, what sets them apart, and what are the pros and cons of every style. The four kinds of brake rotors are: Blank or Smooth (OEM replacement- most vehicles) Cross-Drilled Diamond Slotted Drilled and Slotted Why Choose Blank Brake Rotors? Best for: Street, Autocross/Track, Towing/Hauling, Off-Road Pros: Far and away, most new cars come with...
  14. Automotive Cooling Systems

    An automotive cooling system protects an engine from catastrophic failure (e.g., blown head gaskets, and warped or cracked cylinder heads or cylinder blocks ) due to overheating. Basically, it consists of the following: A series of galleries cast into the engine block and cylinder head, surrounding the combustion chambers with circulating coolant to carry away heat. A mixture of water and antifreeze in proportions appropriate to the climate. Antifreeze itself is usually ethylene glycol or...
  15. Air Conditioning

    Air conditioning was first offered by Packard, in 1939, in its production cars. These units were manufactured by Bishop and Babcock Co, of Cleveland, OH. Cars ordered with the new "Weather Conditioner" were shipped from Packard's East Grand Boulevard facility to the B&B factory where the conversion was performed. Once complete, the car was shipped to a local dealer where the customer would take delivery. Packard fully warranted and supported this conversion, and marketed it well. However,...
Loading...