Oil catch can a "must"

Discussion in 'Dodge Challenger General Maintenance' started by soonercruiser, Jan 14, 2017.

  1. ekladmit

    ekladmit New Member

    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2017
    What catch can should I get for a 2016 challenger scat pack. I looked at speedlogix but I didn't see one for a 6.4


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  2. ekladmit

    ekladmit New Member

    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2017
    Oil catch can a "must"

    Scratch that last comment about not being able to find it at Speedlogix. Now a new question. Is this the one I should buy? Over $200 for the catch can, fittings and cables when 've read posts that you can use a water bottle, not that I would.

    Is there really a difference in a $117 catch can or am I simply paying for the look?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. SRT-Tom

    SRT-Tom Full Access Member

    Posts:
    1,930
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2011
    Location:
    southern New Jersey

    I have the catch can made by Billet Technology (see link, below). This company used to be an aerospace parts provider and specializes in high quality billet aluminum parts for MOPARs. Their high quality catch can costs $110, but you can get it for 40% off if you can wait for its annual sale in mid-November. That's what I have done in purchasing many engine bay and interior pieces for my Challenger. Besides looks, its all about how these cans are constructed. I highly recommend them.

    Not all Catch Cans are created equally! Often imitated, never duplicated. Most Catch Cans on the market are just comprised of an empty container with 2 ports. While that simple design may trap a few oil droplets, a well-engineered Catch Can is designed to condense the oil vapor and trap the oil inside the container. CatchCan

    A test proven design incorporates a stainless steel mesh and screening mechanism that acts like a maze to collect and condense the oil vapor. Once the oil vapors condense into liquid droplets, it falls to the bottom of the can. In addition, the top assembly is specially designed to keep any liquid from climbing out the exit hole during aggressive driving conditions. You will be amazed by how much oil a well designed and engineered Catch Can will catch! Don’t settle for an empty can without any internal baffles and collection systems. The lack of an effective baffle system allow oil to be pulled directly through the intake manifold.

    392-6.4L Engine Bay


    http://www.challengerforum.com/members/srt-tom/albums/my-2009-srt-challenger/
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
  4. AnthonyLopez11B

    AnthonyLopez11B Member

    Age:
    47
    Posts:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2014
    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  5. AnthonyLopez11B

    AnthonyLopez11B Member

    Age:
    47
    Posts:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2014
    Catch cans are a must, I'm upset i waited so long to do it. I've only had it a week in the picture above and collected that much oil in it


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. SRT-Tom

    SRT-Tom Full Access Member

    Posts:
    1,930
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2011
    Location:
    southern New Jersey
    That seems like a lot of oil for only 1 week. How many miles does that represent?

    Also, I see that you have a billet Z-mount bracket, like me. Smart move. It makes it much easier to empty the can.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
  7. AnthonyLopez11B

    AnthonyLopez11B Member

    Age:
    47
    Posts:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2014


    Yeah I thought so too lol it was maybe 200 miles? I drove it 3 hours on a drive to ATL. I hear it collects more when on the highway like that


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. AnthonyLopez11B

    AnthonyLopez11B Member

    Age:
    47
    Posts:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2014


    To and from ATL*


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  9. ekladmit

    ekladmit New Member

    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2017


    Thanks. I ended up going with BT catch can. I have been driving the car for a year now without it so I didn't want to wait another 7 months for the sale. Thanks for the feedback.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  10. SRT-Tom

    SRT-Tom Full Access Member

    Posts:
    1,930
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2011
    Location:
    southern New Jersey
    Take a look at the following link. CLIKCY HERE It's a story from another forum of a guy who took off his intake manifold. He had a catch can in place for the last 9k miles and had about 30k on the engine total. It's not a HEMI, but that's not the point. Scroll down a bit and you'll see the pictures he took of the MESS on his intake valves. He was wondering how bad it would have become if he didn't have a catch can.

    But it's nice to see the actual pictures of the intake valves. It's very likely that most of us have the same exact issue going on.

    What these deposits do:
    There's an excellent article on this subject here: CLICKY HERE

    Beginning at about paragraph 7, the article describes what happens to the fuel/air mixture as it passes a crusted intake valve. The deposits absorb when the engine is cruising at steady state, and they expel what they've absorbed during acceleration. This changes the fuel air mixture just as it passes the valve. It produces a lean condition in the former, rich in the latter. Amazing article.
    It's actually about the lost art of chemically removing carbon. But it's well written and makes a lot of sense.

    That said, it's not likely that having a catch can will completely eliminate this issue. The article above goes on to explain that this gunk on the intake manifold comes from more than one source. One of them as I recall, is the residual oil that must be supplied to lubricate the valve as it travels up and down in the valve guide. A little of this oil makes it's way down the valve stem. Part of the reason it does this is that the intake port is always under vacuum. This vacuum sucks the oil down the valve stem and onto the mushroomed face of the valve. There it comes in contact with a VERY hot intake valve head. It becomes welded onto the valve and the problem begins.

    But herein we find valuable documented evidence

    One main source of intake valve carbon is oil. Granted, according to the aforementioned article (and many others as well), the oil comes from within the valve guide and travels down the valve stem, but the fact remains. My point? More oil from the PCV can't be good, nor can it be harmless.

    Take the time to read the article. at least give it 10 minutes. It's quite educational.

    One of the main methods we can utilize, which is not addressed in the article, may well be a catch can. However, the article does say that...there is something we can do.

    It talks about the effect that a quality gasoline can have on these deposits. Many wrongly assume that using a higher octane premium (than for example the 91 octane that my 392 requires) will provide more additives that will clean off these deposits. Years ago, this may have been true, but not any more. You don't get more or better additives by using a premium over regular or 95 octane over 93 octane. However, this one fact is true. All gasoline are not created equal. Read up on the subject of Tier 1 gasoline. Three of them, for example, are Shell, Chevron, and Mobil. Tier 1 suppliers have agreed to supplement their gasoline with a superior additive package. And since the additives do INDEED help prevent carbon from forming on the intake valves, this matters.

    If you read the article, you'll also learn that the oil you put IN your engine matters as well.
     

Share This Page